TEAM BUILDING

Working in a team environment means that people are interdependent to get the work done. This complicated process can achieve great success but can also be fraught with difficulties.

We use the Rocket Model as our framework to help teams achieve great success. The Rocket Model™ for Team Leadership was created based on more than 30 years of scientific research and studies of groups and teams. The model was built on the decades of science and best practices, making sure that the model integrates what already works. The model was field-tested directly in managerial and organizational practice, mostly as part of leadership and team development programs in multinational corporations and the US Air Force. This was done to make sure the model is simple, practical and immediately applicable.

The model, team assessment and interventions were written and designed by industry iconoclasts Drs. Gordon Curphy and Robert Hogan, The Rocket Model taps research and experience by the world’s leading experts on human behavior, leadership, and team dynamics. Dr. Curphy has written 19 books as well as numerous book chapters, articles, and white papers on leadership and teams. One of his books has been the number one selling leadership textbook for the past 19 years. Dr. Hogan is the author of more than 300 journal articles, chapters and books.

Team Assessment Survey II (TAS II)

THE TEAM ASSESSMENT SURVEY II (TAS II) IS A 41-ITEM ONLINE SURVEY THAT PROVIDES TEAMS WITH DIAGNOSTIC INFORMATION FOR EACH OF THE EIGHT COMPONENTS IN THE ROCKET MODEL™.

What is The Rocket Model™?

The Rocket Model™ is a framework and set of tools for boosting team performance. It can be used to diagnose team dynamics, and to provide leaders with specific tools and activities to improve team performance. 

It was created in response to questions and requests from actual managers working in organizations all over the world – managers struggling to transform their people into effective teams.

EIGHT CRITICAL QUESTIONS EVERY TEAM MUST ANSWER

1. CONTEXT: WHAT ARE OUR CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS?

All too often team members have different views about customers, competitors, and challenges, which leads to misaligned actions, conflict, and poor results. Gaining alignment on critical assumptions is the first step in building effective teams.

2. MISSION: WHY ARE WE HERE?

Teams that do not have a clear purpose and shared goals are destined to fail. Setting specific and measurable goals and determining how progress will be measured is a key step in building effective teams.

3. TALENT: DO WE HAVE THE TALENT WE NEED?

Effective teams have the right number of people, the necessary skills, clear roles, and team members who behave like team players.

4. NORMS: WHAT ARE THE RULES?

All teams have unwritten rules governing their work and interactions. A key question is whether the team’s norms help or hinder success.

5. BUY-IN: ARE WE ALL COMMITTED TO SUCCESS?

If the team agrees to a decision, but only some members act on that decision, team commitment is a problem. The Rocket Model describes three ways leaders can improve commitment.

6. RESOURCES: DO WE HAVE THE RESOURCES NEEDED?

Resources include funding, equipment, space, technology and other material needs, as well as decision-making authority are necessary for achieving results.

7. MORALE: HOW DO WE WORK THROUGH DISAGREEMENTS?

It is a myth that high performing teams don’t have conflict.  Effective teams work through conflicts constructively.  In contrast, dysfunctional teams pretend that conflicts don’t exist, make conflicts about personalities rather than issues, or try to address conflicts through ineffective but feel-good team building activities.

8. RESULTS: ARE WE ACHIEVING OUR GOALS?

Ultimately, teams exist to produce results. They key to evaluating teams is to compare performance against team goals.